Expect Massive Delays in Processing Your Tax Return This Year

Every year, the IRS seems to get just a little farther behind in getting tax refunds back to people. Throw in the processing of Economic Impact Payments and you’ve got yourself a royal mess. In January, the Treasury Department warned taxpayers to expect massive delays in processing of your tax returns this year. That’s just great, right? But…relax! Below we offer some tips on how to get your cash back as soon as possible.

Expect Massive Delays in Processing Your Tax Return This Year. An image of the red and white John A. Cochran, Esquire business card and some tax forms.
You can probably expect massive delays in processing your tax return this year.
File ASAP

The early bird gets the refund faster. If you put your return in the queue earlier, there will be fewer returns ahead of yours to process. Keep your files organized and ready to go. If you haven’t gotten organized yet, make it a priority. The IRS is still saying they’ll strive to process refunds within 21 days of receipt. And that theoretically can happen for you if you file your return early and don’t raise any red flags.

File Electronically

To expedite your tax refund process, move away from paper submission. Filing paper returns requires time-intensive, manual processing. To ensure a smoother process, file electronically with direct deposit to avoid delays in process, receiving refunds, or notices from the IRS. More than 90% of 160 million people who file taxes submit their returns electronically. You can also check the status of your refund on the IRS’s Where’s My Refund? page.

Have Documentation for Everything

Whether you file a simple W-2 each year or a complicated small business owner return, have documentation for everything. Have your documentation saved electronically for easy access should you be asked to provide proof of anything in your submission. Any questionable numbers will increase your odds of an audit. Make sure the numbers match on the forms before you submit your return. Anything you’re unsure about leads into our next recommendation…

Don’t Guess, Ask an Expert

Even if you think you have a simple preparation process, rules change all the time. If you can’t easily locate an answer to your question, don’t just guess at what to do. Take the time to ask an expert. Even the big online processing companies have an option to connect with a CPA. The small fee for a consultation could end up saving you thousands in the long run. If you have an especially complex situation, your best bet is to enlist the help of an experienced tax attorney.

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Exercise Patience

Fun fact: the IRS has been running with the same number of staff since the 1970s, despite the American population increasing by 60% since then. Nearly 75% of American taxpayers expect a refund each year, so you’re not alone. Many people count on their tax return to fund vacations or use it pay down debt. However, depending on those refund checks coming in by a certain time can backfire on you. As of December 31, 2021, six million people were still waiting for the IRS to process their 2020 returns. As frustrating as this delay is, there’s nothing you can do. ​

In conclusion, we hope this blog, Expect Massive Delays in Processing Your Tax Return This Year helps with your tax preparation plans. Need help getting your taxes ready or have a question? Our experienced tax professionals can help you minimize any taxes you owe and ensure you comply with all applicable laws. Complete our online form or call us today at 724-216-5180 to learn more.

Seven Tax Considerations for New Businesses

Seven tax considerations for new businesses is our blog topic this month. Did you start a business in 2021? As we enter tax season, we see a lot of new owners make several common mistakes. Here’s seven tax considerations for new businesses to keep you out of hot water with the IRS.

Seven Tax Considerations for New Businesses. An image of a small white tablet with Small Business written on it. Business law and business tax.
Newer business owners need to know small business taxes.
1. Yes, You Have to File Taxes.

Above all, you’ll need to understand how rules changes if you’re new to running a business. As an individual, you only need to file taxes if your gross income exceeds $12,550. That number drops to a net income of $400 as a business owner. You also have to carefully monitor all your income and expenses, much more than as an employee.

2. And Yes, You May Have to Pay Quarterly Estimated Taxes.

When you work for someone else, they take takes out of your paycheck on your behalf. So, when you work for yourself, the IRS expects you to estimate your taxes and submit them quarterly. Failing to do so sets you up for underpayment penalties.

3. Claim Start Up Costs.

Even if you run your business from your kitchen table, it cost money to get set up. You can deduct anything you needed to pay to get up and running, including research and training (Subject to a $5K Limitation ). You can claim everything from marketing, website creation, office furniture and supplies, vehicle costs, and more.

4. The IRS Sees You As ‘Fresh Meat.’

Unfortunately, having your own business raises all sorts of interest from the IRS. Getting audited isn’t the end of the world, IF you’ve carefully followed directions on expenses and deductions with receipts. Keeping up with all the changes year to year can get overwhelming. And if you make a mistake, it can get expensive really quick.

5. Don’t Mix Business and Personal Finances.

If you’ve just started out, you may not have thought about having a separate business checking account yet. But this is one of the first things you should do as a new business owner. Even if you barely edge over that $400 net income line, have a separate account for business income and expenses. This makes things easier to separate for filing purposes and cleaner during any audits.

6. Self-Employed? Don’t Expect a Refund.

Most employees look forward to late spring every year when they receive a windfall as part of their tax return. We’ll leave for another conversation as to why you should minimize tax refunds that basically serve as free loans for the government. Most small businesses serve as a pass-through entity for the owner’s income. Owners pay taxes on that income as part of their individual taxes without any withholdings to absorb the additional taxes. ​

7. Learn from this Return.

Even with a tax specialist helping you, expect a few lessons on how to improve next year. Look closely at your return. Go over it with a tax expert and make sure you understand any penalties or additional deductions for next year. We like to say it’s not rocket science. But, when you’re just starting out, it can really feel like it!

Did you start a business in 2021? If you feel unsure on what to organize or how to get started, relax! We hope that our Seven Tax Considerations for New Businesses blog helped a little.

Still confused? Our, our experienced tax professionals can help you minimize any taxes you owe and ensure you comply with all applicable laws. Complete our online form or call us today at 724-216-5180 to learn more.

7. Learn from this Return Even with a tax specialist helping you, expect a few lessons on how to improve next year. Look closely at your return. Go over it with a tax expert and make sure you understand any penalties or additional deductions for next year. We like to say it’s not rocket science, but when you’re just starting out, it can really feel like it! Did you start a business in 2021 ? If you feel unsure on what to organize or how to get started, relax! O ur experienced tax professionals can help you minimize any taxes you owe and ensure you comply with all applicable laws. Complete our online form or call us today at 724-216-5180 to learn more.

Prepare for the Inevitable Upcoming Tax Season

Every year right between Christmas and New Year’s people start dreading tax season. That shoe box or receipt drawer may not close all the way anymore. Maybe you just found the statement for quarterly tax estimates (from June) in another pile of papers. Likewise, maybe your resolution list from January 2021 just resurfaced that included “stay on top of taxes” on the list. You already know that when you prepare for the inevitable upcoming tax season, it will suck so much less. So, let’s get started!

Prepare for the Inevitable Upcoming Tax Season. Image of red and white John A. Cochran, Esq letter head with money in background.
Get Out Ahead of Crunch Time

Rather than pouring yourself another cup of cheer and making tax preparations next year’s problem, face it head on. You can pour that cup of cheer if you’d like. However, digging in now will make Future You so much less stressed come tax time.

Picture yourself the evening of April 14, 2022, what do you see yourself doing? Do you see yourself furiously adding up totals? Trying to find random tax documentations? Or would you rather have plans to join your buddies for a well-deserved thirsty Thursday at the local watering hole?

Get Organized

Most tax experts will say it matters less how you organize your paperwork but more that you actually do it. So long as you have materials in order so that you can produce documentation requested for tax purposes, you’re good. You will save money in preparation fees.

If you don’t currently have a system or experience exasperated looks from your tax professional each year, ask yourself why. Perhaps your current system or lack thereof could use a tune up? Rely on the advice of experts on how to create or improve on your current techniques. You’ll make everyone’s lives easier.

Check Your Information

Double check that all your information on file with the IRS is correct, including direct deposit information for refunds. Even something as simple as an address change can get forgotten during a busy year.

Closely examine everything from dependent information to retirement and investment accounts to income streams. This year remember to check Economic Impact Payments and Child Tax Credit Updates, too, if applicable. Spotting differences now can avoid potential problems after filing.

Ask Questions and Get Clarifications Early

Do some early research to see if you need to file differently or can add new deductions. Whether you work with an accountant or use a self-service tax filing tool, ask follow-up questions from the experts.

Get clarification on changes in tax deductions early in the season so you have time to do something about them. Finding out about a new deduction does no good if you didn’t save the proof necessary to claim it.

Nervous about this upcoming tax season? How will you prepare for the inevitable upcoming tax season? Relax! Our experienced tax professionals can help you minimize any taxes you owe and ensure you comply with all applicable laws. We help our clients avoid legal issues with their taxes while providing peace of mind. Complete our online form or call us today at 724-216-5180 to learn more.

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Making Charitable Donations Part of Your Estate Plan

As you create an estate plan ( yes, you need one ), consider how your assets will be divided upon your death. Most people don’t consider charitable donations as a way to minimize estate/inheritance taxes. However, did you know that making charitable donations part of your estate plan could lessen the tax burden for your heirs? Read on to learn more.

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Why Designate Charitable Donations in Estate Plans?

For example, some people decide they don’t want to leave all their assets to their children or other beneficiaries. Likewise, others don’t have beneficiaries to leave their assets to but want to ensure their estate contributes to a lasting legacy.

For anyone passionate about a specific cause, making charitable donations part of your estate plan may be the right choice for you. Leaving funds or other assets to a designated charity could make the most impact. Tax-exempt charities are set up to maximize the effectiveness of gifts they receive, planned or otherwise.

Any funds given to a recognized public charity are not taxable. While this may decrease the overall amount any named beneficiaries receive, most people appreciate the sentiment during their grieving period. Making charitable donations part of your estate plan may be a good choice.

What Charities Count?

Any charity recognized by the IRS as a 501(c)(3) can receive tax-exempt donations as part of an estate plan. These include charitable organizations, churches and religious organizations, private foundations, and other non-profits.

In addition, depending on the size of your gift, you should contact the charity to inform them of your plans. They may need time to prepare for a large gift (over $10,000). They can also provide basic information to list in the estate plan to streamline the process. If you do name other beneficiaries in your estate plan, you should probably let them know your plans, too. This can minimize hurt feelings and contested wills upon your death.

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How to Get Started.

There are a number of ways to plan gift to charities, foundations, or others as part of your estate plan. Estate/inheritance tax rules seem to change every year. So, your estate attorney can work with your designated charities to determine which options make the most sense for everyone. By making your wishes clear in your estate plan, you leave little room for misinterpretation. You can minimize additional work for your heirs and maximize their tax benefits while supporting organizations important to you.

In conclusion, are you not sure how to name a charity in your estate plan? RELAX! Our estate planning experts can walk you through options. Each will fit your unique circumstances. We help with will preparation, trust creation and administration, probate administration, and more. Call us today at 724-216-5180 or complete the online form to schedule a free consultation.

Tax Implications of Closing a Business in 2020

An unfortunate side effect of the global pandemic and economic impact has been the closing of small businesses. But just closing the doors doesn’t end the story. Depending on business structure and number of employees, closing your doors forever can hold additional costs if not done correctly. Today, we’ll discuss the tax implications of closing a business in 2020. 

Structure Complexity Impacts Your Tax Implications

How you structured your business will determine the steps you’ll need to take for a full closing. In addition to filing annual returns and related forms, you will need to pay final wages or compensation to employees. You will also need to cancel your employer identification number (EIN) and close your IRS business account. 

Sole Proprietorships with zero employees, especially when operated from your dining room table, come with little issues when closing. Businesses operations with contractors, employees, or storefronts will need to follow a run-out strategy for payroll, contracts, and leases as well as additional book-closing steps. 

Partnerships operate like sole proprietorships when closing for good. Owners will need to account for dissolution and personal tax impacts. 

C-Corporations, because of their complexities, require far more processing. It includes selling off assets or liquidating stocks. Owners will also need to petition the State for dissolution and various clearance certificates.

Business Requirements

If your business had employees or used contractors, it should go without saying that you need to pay them. You also need to issue their final income statements for their tax filing purposes. 

If you provide a pension or benefit plan for your employees, see how to Terminate a Retirement Plan. If you provide Health Savings Accounts or similar programs for your employees, see About Publication 969.

When you close your business, you will still need to pay final taxes. (You don’t think they’d forget, do you?) This includes n any gains you may have had on selling the business or selling off its remaining assets. 

Keep Records of Everything when Closing a Business
Closed sign for business.

Careful bookkeeping helps business owners and their tax pros through the entire life cycle of a business. An audit by state or federal authorities is never fun, especially if the business activity that spawned the audit is now shut down. Then you incur additional cost and relive the closing experience without the benefit of any new money. If you destroy all supporting documentation on a closed business, you have just compounded that bad experience.

So please, hold onto your tax returns, unemployment records, and other business documents. Digitizing files can make it easier to store them without shoeboxes taking up precious real estate in your hallway closet.

This year has been difficult enough, get peace of mind now by addressing the tax implications of closing a business in 2020. Then you can begin the next chapter of your life with a clean slate. Need help pulling together your material or filling out necessary paperwork? Relax! We have years of experience providing efficient tax return preparation services and business minimizing tax liabilities, even after closure. Call John A. Cochran, Esquire, in Greensburg at 724-216-0704 or use our online form to schedule a free consultation.

Last Chance: 2019 Taxes are Due on July 15

photo of 1040 ta x form

Consider this your public service announcement. You had an extra three months, but this is your last chance: 2019 taxes are due on July 15. Despite a few hopeful rumors circulating, the IRS recently confirmed it was not going to push the deadline back any farther. Sorry. 

Cramming Sessions for Filing Taxes

We’ve mentioned on here multiple times about the virtues of starting earlier in the year to reduce stress associated with filing taxes. Every year people who’ve taken our advice return more organized, better prepared, and generally less annoyed at the whole process. But we also know how hard it is to start a new habit. Inevitably the same individuals will return year after year deep into the 11th hour. They show up stressed, angry, and thoroughly unprepared for the cramming session necessary to file on time. The pandemic offered an unheard-of reprieve for those unable to get their ish together in time. 

2019 Tax Variations

The global pandemic’s impact caused the Treasury Department to many different types of tax deadlines, including filing annual 2019 returns. The IRA also pushed back deadlines for first quarter estimated taxes for 2020. By the way, less common filings (think taxes owed on trusts and estates) also saw their filing deadlines shifted to July 15. However, they didn’t push back deadlines for second quarter. So, yes, if your typical send in quarterly estimated tax payments, you have three different tax dates and one has already past.

Extending Extensions

The normal procedures still apply if extending filing past July 15. So, Master Procrastinator, an individual can extend filing until October 15 (but you still have to file that form by July 15). A business can file for extension, too, but again must submit the paperwork by July 15. While this may tempt you into further procrastination, remember this does NOT extend the due date for paying any taxes owed as part of the filing. Not only will you still owe the same amount, but it will also include late fees. 

Still haven’t gotten started on your 2019 taxes yet? Relax! We can help ensure you stay in good graces with the IRS. We can also find additional avenues for you to pay the lowest taxes possible while staying in compliance. To learn more, call our office at 724-216-5180 or use our online form.

Do Not Approach Filing Taxes like Speed Dating

Read that again. Do not approach filing your taxes like speed dating, especially for small businesses. You cannot expect to whirl through filing your business taxes like a gigolo at a speed dating event. What kind of success can you expect running to meet a new person every three minutes? Check the statistics: speed dating only results in a 4-percent success rate in the long run. Anticipate the same dastardly (I love that word) results if you approach filing business taxes with a similar attitude.

The Future is Now

Yes, the IRS extended filing federal taxes until July 15, 2020 this year. In March or April, that probably felt like a million years away. You know, a Future You problem. Back then you needed to focus on following stay-at-home orders, COVID-19 concerns, and basically watching the world fall apart. The extension intended to give business owners time to get back to normal.

Newsflash for the Feds: we’re still not back to ‘normal’ business. But that doesn’t give you as a small business owner any more leeway. The extended deadline the federal government so graciously bestowed upon us is fast approaching. The future is now. Time to face reality and get moving.

Business taxes require more paperwork, documentation, and time to process. Meaning, business owners face a tighter crunch time that typical W-2 filers. As a double whammy, business owners also must file your first and second quarter estimated income tax payments the same day. 

Get It Together… Now

Don’t try to excuse your procrastinating ways by saying you work better under pressure. I don’t subscribe to the tactic of creating self-induced stressful situations. You want pressure? Try having only three minutes to pitch yourself to a potential mate. Nope, pressure doesn’t seem to help the speed daters, regardless of their schticks. The IRS doesn’t want your smooth operator lines either. 

That means you have to dig in, burn the midnight oil, and grind this out. My recommendation? Pull together all your spreadsheets, paperwork, and crumpled receipts before you get started. I promise you, if you have to get up to retrieve a stray document, something will distract you… especially food. Or finding Mr./Ms. Right.  

Our offices can’t help with your dating problems, but we’re here to help you end your procrastinating ways. We can get you through this tax season and set you up for success moving forward. Future you will thank you.

Do you have business tax issues, need filing an extension, or have specific tax-related questions? RELAX. Call our office at 724-216-5180 or complete the online form to schedule a free consultation.  

Common Tax Filing Mistakes

A graphic depicting tax filing materials


Whether you file your own taxes or work with a professional preparer, there are a few common mistakes you must avoid. Some could even delay your receipt of your funds from the CARES Act. You may laugh at these common tax filing mistakes below… unless you make them. 

Misspelled or different given names

If you ever took the SATs in high school, you may recall you got 200 points just for spelling your name right. There’s a lot more riding on spelling correctly and using your legal name now. Even if you hate your legal name, you’ll love the refund attached to it. The same goes for anyone who legally changes their name (ex: marriage, divorce, for fun). Whatever name the Social Security Administration has on file, use it on your tax paperwork.

Direct Deposit Errors

It’s more secure to request a direct deposit of a refund than having the IRS mail you a refund check and you receive your cash WEEKS earlier. However, the danger lies in making sure those digits are correct when you provide them. Errors in routing or account numbers could see your refund heading to another person’s bank account. The funds could also be returned to the IRS, delaying your receipt of your hard-earned cash. 

Side Hustles and Investment Earnings
Did you receive a 1099 for contract work last year? Guess what, you need to claim this on your taxes (yes, the IRS knows about it since the client sent a copy of your 1099 to them, too). Likewise, if you received funds from investments, you must claim this as income. If you “forget” about either of these, the IRS will remind you. Unfortunately, these reminders tend to include a penalty and interest on unreported income taxation.

Qualified Charitable Distributions

Make sure you adhere to the charitable donations guidelines posted on the IRS site. Bonus: If you’re an avid reader of my blog – and of course you are – we recently discussed a number of tax tips for filers over age 50. One of those tips offered advice for individuals who must take required minimum distributions from Traditional or Roth IRAs. By donating the full amount to charity, you exempt that income from taxation. 

With the IRS extending filing dates to July 15, you have time to ensure your information is complete and correct. Our office can help ensure you stay in good graces with the IRS. We can also find additional avenues for you to pay the lowest taxes possible while staying in compliance. To learn more, call our office at 724-216-5180 or use our online form.

9 Tax Tips if You’re Over 50

A photo of a person doing their taxes: discussing 9 tax tips if you're over 50

Taxes probably rank pretty low in order of importance right now during the coronavirus pandemic. Timing when to file could work to your advantage if you have concerns about income, especially if you consider these 9 tax tips you may overlook if you’re over 50. 

If you anticipate getting a refund, adhering to the April 15 deadline will get your refund to you more quickly. If you may owe the IRS, I suggest filing as soon as you can but holding out until July 15 to pay what is due. Keep that cash longer in your pocket instead. 

When you do file, finding every possible avenue to decrease your tax liability is all the more important this year. To help, check out these lesser known tax tips for anyone age 50 and older.

1. Catch-Up Contributions to 401(k)

Contributing to your 401(k) maxes out each year for everyone. In 2019, that limit was $19,000 until the age 50. From that point on you can contribute an additional $6,000 as “catch-up” in preparations for retirement for a total annual contribution of $25,000. 

2. Catch-Up Contributions to Traditional or Roth IRAs

Likewise, if you’re age 50 or older, you can also contribute an additional $1,000 to either for a total of $7,000. The underage set can only sock away a total of $6,000. By the way, you must withdraw required minimum distribution (RMDs) by age 70.5. BUT, if you donate that amount to charity, you don’t have to pay a dime of taxes on it. However, if your 70th birthday is July 1, 2019 or later, you do not have to begin your RMD until the age of 72.

3. Health Savings Account Contributions

It’s a fact of life. The older we get, the greater the likelihood we will need increased care. HSAs provide a tax-deductible way to save for these inevitable expenses, allowing single taxpayers over the age of 55 to put away $4,500 and $8,000 for families. 

4. Drawing down Cash from 401(k) Retirement Funds

If you’re over the age of 59 ½ (yes, we start counting half-birthdays from here on out), congratulations! You’ll no longer pay a 10 percent penalty for withdrawing funds from your retirement accounts. Bonus: among various exceptions to the 10 percent penalty, if you’re over the age of 55 and leave a job, you can start receiving distributions immediately from your 401(k).

5. Lifelong learning credits

While not only for the 50+ crowd, the Lifetime Learning credit can be claimed for you or your spouse for more than four years. The credit, worth up to $2,000 annually, can be claimed for education expenses that lead to new or improved skills. Again, this credit has modified adjusted gross income restrictions, phasing out between $58,000-$68,000 for singles and $116,000-$136,000 for married couples.

6. 529 Education Plans

Similarly, grandparents can finance education costs for their grandkids and score a tax break for 529 plans. Once meant only for eligible colleges and universities, 529 plans now cover K-12 expenses for any public, private or religious institution.

7. Increase you Standard Deduction

If you’re over the age of 65, you automatically qualify for a larger standard deduction. How much? The standard deduction in 2019 for those over age 65 increased by $1,650 for single households; if you and your spouse file jointing and are both over age 65, you can add a total of $2,600. (Caveat: your standard deduction could be reduced is someone else claims you as a dependent.)

8. Medical and Dental Expenses

If your unreimbursed medical bills account for more than 10.0 percent of your adjusted gross income – and you itemize your deductions – you may be able to deduct some or all of those expenses. This also applies to buying long-term care insurance, which, depending on your age, could add up to more than $5,400.

9. Tax Credit for Elderly or Disabled Care

Finally, you may qualify for the tax credit for the Elderly or for the Disabled. To qualify, you must either be 65 or older or retired on permanent and total disability with taxable disability income. A reminder: this credit as strict income limits.

Of course, this list of tax tips provides just a sampling of the many additional perks of being a “Boomer.” The IRS helpfully offers this “simple” guide to understanding all the tax breaks for older Americans. Our office can help break down the guide for you and find additional avenues to pay the lowest taxes possible. To learn more, call our office at 724-216-5180 or use our online form.

How will taxes affect your business strategy?

If you’re a business owner, you know that every decision affects your business in myriad ways. With tax season in full swing, these aspects are likely (or should be) on the forefront of business owners’ minds. So, how will taxes affect your business strategy this year?

Informed Decisions

For example, finance and business strategies often fail to consider the role of taxes during the decision-making process. This is especially true of plans for small businesses. Effective business planning means accounting for every possible impact of a transaction on the overall health of a business. Owners must factor in all tax and non-tax costs into final decisions by reviewing their Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats. Anyone familiar with SWOT analyses knows that the entries that populate the classic project planning quadrant for decisions have far-reaching, and often unexpected implications.

At least partly, taxes affect your business strategy because of the implications of a move. Whether forming a business, raising capital, expanding or divesting business, taxes have a direct impact on cash flow. Taxes can divert as much as 40 percent of a business’s pretax cash flow to the government. Planning accordingly for these implications can prevent a business owner from being caught “flat-footed” and finding themselves deep in the red with the IRS. 

Whole fields devote study to taxes and business strategy. Every business school worth its weight in saIt offers a full program on considering the taxes, accounting and financial trade-offs involved in strategic planning. I won’t attempt to surpass thought leaders like Scholes, Wolfson and company (google them); however, there’s a reason their classic text, Taxes and Business Strategy, and others after have been so popular. The complexity of the tax code, coupled with how it can impact a business’s future plans, requires expert eyes. A true analysis takes a holistic approach to decision-making. 

Tax Structure

Business owners need to consider both explicit taxes (tax dollars paid directly to taxing authorities) and implicit taxes (taxes paid indirectly as lower before-tax rates for overall return on investments). I cannot stress how important it is to have a team of experts review any business deals before finalizing them. Experts in these fields can potentially save your business tens of thousands of dollars in the long run. 

Let’s say you receive the green light for moving forward with a proposition. Your next goal should be to minimize the amount of tax revenue the IRS makes off your transaction. Certain structuring can help you lower your tax bill while staying in compliance. 

If you’re considering more complex maneuvers, you need a tax attorney to help you navigate processes. This includes converting ordinary income into capital gains that are subject to lower tax rates or completing legal moves that shift transactions and tax consequences. 

With extensive experience in tax preparation and tax law, we’ve helped our clients save thousands of dollars in federal taxes. We can help you pay the minimum amount of taxes possible while still being in compliance with federal tax law. If you have questions or would like to schedule a consultation discuss your specific needs, call our office at 724-216-5180 or use our online form.